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Let's Hear It From The Girls! PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Thursday, 20 June 2013 18:20

If your instant visualization of a jazz musician is a middle-aged gentleman, possibly with a receding hairline, a slightly wrinkled face and a constantly tapping toe, visualize again!

Bria Skonberg at the 2013 Elkhart (IN) Jazz FestivalNothing could be farther from the reality of two of the most talented jazz musicians being featured in the Elkhart Jazz Festival 2013.

Both are young, very talented, very attractive and very well-versed on the subject of jazz — past and present — and undoubtedly will play an important part in its future.

The only difference is that Bria Skonberg plays trumpet and flugelhorn and Ariel Pocock can be found at the piano.

Both will be familiar to regular visitors at past EJFs.

Bria came to the 2009 EJF as a member of the west coast sextet Mighty Aphrodite, an all-girl group which was a definite plus that year. She not only played but sang. Today she leads the Bria Skonberg Quintet and has changed her “coast of residence” to New York City.

Last Updated on Sunday, 23 June 2013 21:29
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Musical Triple-Header For Mom PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Friday, 12 May 2017 19:36

Sunday being that special day when all good offspring do something nice for mom, I offer three choices of solid family fare, each on stage nightly, plus a couple of matinees. though Sunday.

The price of tickets is wide-spread but even the most expensive falls way below the current prince in a larger market.

Beginning at the top, look at the national tour of “Motown: The Musical,” which says it all in the title. Playing in the marvelous Miller Auditorium in Kalamazoo, “Motown” begs to be the “true” story of Berry Gordy, founder and ruler of the record label that took its name, in a condensed version, from the nickname — Motor City — of Gordy’s home town.

Who cares if the theatrical version is slanted obviously to making Gordy the “good guy” (it’s based on his autobiography, he wrote the script and is a producer). The important thing is that, in two and a half hours, it brings back an era and a musical genre that molded at least one generation.

I dare you to sit still when The Temptations, the Supremes, the Commodores, the Vandellas, the Four Tops, the Marvellettes, the Contours and the Jackson 5 hit the stage. Ditto for Diana Ross, Smokey Robinson, Jackie Wilson, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder. All are incredibly close to the sound of the originals.

Even if you cannot name each of the 59-plus songs, some in part and some complete, recalled in the solid vocals, you won’t be able to sit still — and feel free to sing along!

Most of the 28 cast members play several roles, but Gordy (Chester Gregory), Ross (Allison Semmes), Gaye (Jarran Muse) and Robinson (David Kaverman) never miss a beat or a ceiling-shattering note!

Have to admit my favorite was young Michael Jackson (Raymond Davis Jr./CJ Wright). The boys alternate, so I don’t know which one played the burgeoning superstar the night we went (it should be noted!), but from the talent level of the adult cast, both must be outstanding!

For show times and ticket information call (269) 387-2300 or (800) 228-9858.

To borrow from The Supremes: the next show, like “Motown,” ends on Sunday.

It is “Singin’ in the Rain,” offered at the Lerner Theatre by Premier Arts.

Can’t comment on the show as I haven’t seen this production yet but will say that the film, and just about all the stage productions I have seen (and I can’t count how many) have proven to be extremely entertaining and a great way to spend several hours with a totally family-friendly musical.

The ticket price is right, so it’s not too costly to take a chance. Sure you will be pleasantly surprised.

For show times and reservations, call (574) 293-4469 or visit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

The final part of the musical trilogy is the South Bend Civic Theatre production of “Big River,” based on Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” with music by the late “King of the Road” Roger Miller.

The “Muddy Water” will be flowing through May 21, with Huck, Jim, the Duke, the King and Tom Sawyer dancing and singing in the SBCT Wilson Auditorium.

Another musical aimed at the enjoyment of the whole family. For additional information, check my review, also on this website!

Last Updated on Friday, 12 May 2017 19:41
 
Season Starts With Music And Dance PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 02 November 2016 19:14

In anticipation of the upcoming season — and filling the gap between Halloween and Thanksgiving — Elkhart Civic Theatre presents a holiday classic,White Christmas  Elkhart Civic Theatre  Bristol IN “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas,” Friday through Nov. 19 at the Bristol Opera House. The feel-good script is filled with Berlin classics featuring the title tune as well as “Count Your Blessings,” “Sisters,” “Blue Skies,” “I Love A Piano” and “How Deep Is The Ocean.” It tells the story of two singing sisters, the duo of entertaining ex-soldiers who love them and the G.I.’s former commanding officer who needs all their help to save his New England lodge. Let the theatrical version of the ever-popular 1954 film classic light up your holidays. For show dates and times, call (574) 848-4116 between 1 and 5:30 p.m. weekdays or visit www.elkhartcivictheatre.org.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 November 2016 19:36
 
Lewis' Comedy Precedes Stand-Up PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 15 November 2017 18:31

It’s not often that the author of a play generates as much or more interest than the play itself, but when that author is best known as a standup comic, and the play is his solo effort, I guess it is natural.

It also might have some bearing on the sell-out crowds attending the South Bend Civic Theatre production of “One Slight Hitch.”

The playwright is Lewis Black, the perennially panicked perpetrator of rants against the disintegration of the world with emphasis on the U.S. government.

If the hope that one of these is incorporated in the plot of “One Slight Hitch,” first know that it was written several decades ago (before solo comedy won out) and could have been one of the deciding factors in Black’s turning to outrage.

It is a two-act comedy/farce complete with many slamming doors and characters in underwear.

First about the doors.

The show is in the Barbara K. Warner Studio Theatre which means that all four sides of the playing area are/can be open. The set in any farce worth its hysteria must contain at least three or four solidly-built, frequently-slammable doors. Not easy to design or build with little to hold on to.

Fortunately, SBCT has a talented artist as set designer/builder/painter for this production. Jeff Barrick’s multiple doors, while rather bland in hue, are solid enough to withstand numerous vigorous slams without even a slight tremor and obviously are a salute to theatrical engineering.

Set in a family home in a suburb of Cincinnati, the décor also bears out one character’s comment that “Ohio is the valium of the Midwest.”

The family in question is made up of a dad, “Doc” Coleman (Brad Mazick), and mom, Delia (Marybeth Saunders), and daughters PB (Karla Levy), a teenager most frequently connected to her Walkman; Melanie (Christine Schrader), a nurse and alcoholic-in –training; and Courtney (Kimberlee Giles), a successful writer and the bride-to-be.

As the action begins Doc and Delia are counting down her “to-do” list for Courtney’s wedding to wealthy psychology student Harper (Tyler Miller), a list which is driving Delia to distraction as the nuptials are to be held at home in a matter of hours.

Into the increasing maelstrom of pre-wedding activities comes Ryan (Bill Svelmoe), a recovering hippie and would-be writer as well as Courtney’s former boyfriend of 2 ½ years from NYC.

Ryan knows nothing about the wedding. He is hitchhiking across the country and just stopped in to say hello. His reaction to the news that Delia, who left him only a few months ago after making it clear that she never wanted to marry, is about to tie the knot adds to the total confusion. Especially since his primary post-shower costume is a bath towel.

Everyone has his/her opinion on just which man should be the bridegroom and there is a final curtain (or blackout) wedding, but getting there takes much too long.

Possibly this is because the characters are solidly one-dimensional and the script cannot decide whether it wants to be a full-out farce or a comedic message play (see Delia’s Act 2 shift from screamer to caring mother).

Audience seniors will enjoy the familiar ‘80s music shared by good natured PB whose “bottom of the family totem pole” status is obvious even before Delia issues the first of an unending list of her pre-wedding chores .

By the time Courtney makes up her mind, it’s difficult to really care.

The pace is set by director Richard Baxter with costumes by Tania Balve. Tried to remember if they were “period perfect” for the ‘80s but only wound up wondering why Courtney wore the wedding gown.

You might figure it out for yourself if there are any tickets left. The show reportedly is a sellout.

“ONE SLIGHT HITCH” plays through Sunday in the South Bend Civic Warner Studio Theatre. For information and reservations, call (574) 234-1112.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 15 November 2017 18:33
 
'Sister Act' Nuns Make Heavenly Music PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 18 September 2017 16:14

The primary “lost chords” in the theatrical musical based on (and named after) the hit 1992 film “Sister Act” are the original pop songs which the primary character turned into pop hymns.

Sister Act  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreThe South Bend Civic Theatre production, which opened Friday evening in the Wilson Auditorium, features an original score (mostly mediocre) by composer Alan Menken and lyricist Glenn Slater and a much-revised book by Cheri and Bill Steinkellner with additional material by Douglas Carter Beane.

The plot is much the same as the film with Danae Watson as aspiring lounge singer Deloris Van Cartier, a role that, unfortunately for anyone who fills it, lies firmly in the shadow of the film’s star Whoopi Goldberg.

Sister Act  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreAs it opens, Deloris is auditioning for a job in the club owned by her boyfriend gangster Curtis Jackson (Allen Roberts II). Angered by his dismissal, she goes to return his gift of a fur piece originally owned by his wife and, with unfortunate timing, witnesses his murder of an “associate” he believes talked about him to the police.

Immediately, Deloris is the object of a murderous search by Curtis and his gang — Joey (Annie Bretz), TJ (Brielle Hall) and Pablo (Cristian Marquez). She runs to the police and finds Lt. Eddie Souther (George Spohter), an old school friend, who immediately puts her in police protection — in a local convent.

She is as unhappy to be there as the Mother Superior (Patty Noonan) is to have her. As Sister Mary Clarence, Deloris is definitely a square peg in a round hole until she is assigned to the mostly out-of-tune convent choir.

With Sister Mary Patrick (Laura Martin), novice Sister Mary Robert (Erin Joines) and current choir leader Sister Mary Lazarus (Connie Chalko), she trains the sisters to sing in tune and in time and they soon add an up-tempo hymn to their Sunday repertoire, much to the horror of the Mother Superior and the delight of Monsignor O’Hara (William Loring), who sees the choir’s new success as a way to revive the about-to-be-demolished church.

This is, indeed, where things look up in “Sister Act.” When the sisters raise their voices in song, the energy level goes heaven-ward and it’s definitely difficult to keep from at least toe-tapping if not clapping in rhythm.

The infectious energy of the nuns’ ensemble makes the price of a ticket more than worthwhile.

sister Act  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreMusical highlights include the three hoods’ “Lady in The Long Black Dress.” the rejuvenated choir’s “Saturday Morning Fever,” Noonan’s retreat “Haven’t Got A Prayer,” and Joines’ plea for guidance “The Life I Never Led.” A standout is the solo work delivered by Calko whose comic delivery is literally head and shoulders above the rest.

Directors Stephen and Stephanie Salisbury keep the pace as brisk as possible and the music right on track in a cast in which many are young stage first-timers and play two and three characters.

The three “hoods, obviously roles written for men, are played here by one man and two women. It works well and is a testimony to doing the best with those who audition, a landmark of community theater. Their trio, “Lady in the Long Black Dress,” delivered on the hunt for Deloris, received well-deserved and sustained applause.

David Chudzynski’s set design goes from secular to sacred with ease but set changes need some rehearsal to achieve the quietest transition possible.

The lingering problem of hearing dialogue is still present in the large, domed Wilson Auditorium although not as obvious in a musical as a straight play. One hopes it will continue to improve.

“SISTER ACT” plays through Oct.1 in the Wilson Auditorium, 215 W. Madison St., South Bend. For performance times and reservations, call (574) 234-1112.

Last Updated on Monday, 18 September 2017 17:17
 
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