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Let's Hear It From The Girls! PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Thursday, 20 June 2013 18:20

If your instant visualization of a jazz musician is a middle-aged gentleman, possibly with a receding hairline, a slightly wrinkled face and a constantly tapping toe, visualize again!

Bria Skonberg at the 2013 Elkhart (IN) Jazz FestivalNothing could be farther from the reality of two of the most talented jazz musicians being featured in the Elkhart Jazz Festival 2013.

Both are young, very talented, very attractive and very well-versed on the subject of jazz — past and present — and undoubtedly will play an important part in its future.

The only difference is that Bria Skonberg plays trumpet and flugelhorn and Ariel Pocock can be found at the piano.

Both will be familiar to regular visitors at past EJFs.

Bria came to the 2009 EJF as a member of the west coast sextet Mighty Aphrodite, an all-girl group which was a definite plus that year. She not only played but sang. Today she leads the Bria Skonberg Quintet and has changed her “coast of residence” to New York City.

Last Updated on Sunday, 23 June 2013 21:29
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No New Twists In South Bend's 'Joseph' PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 30 January 2017 22:29

Way, way back many decades ago, not long after Lloyd Webber began — actually before his big “Superstar” explosion — Sir Andrew (assisted by Tim Rice) created “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.”

It was short, it was snappy, it was made up of several music styles including pop, rock, jazz, calypso, ballad, Charleston. The music stretched from one end of the narrative to the other leaving very, very little room for dialogue.

Joseph/Dreamcoat South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreBest of all, the original pop cantata, written in 1968 for a British boy’s school, was only 15 minutes long.

By its third choral performance, however, it had expanded to 35 minutes and included several new songs. The universality of its theme and the mixed genre of musical styles formed the basis for a full — albeit short — production which finally landed on Broadway in 1982.

Joseph/Dreamcoat  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreSince then, it has become the favorite of civic groups, choruses, schools and community theaters everywhere.

One good thing about “Joseph,” in addition to its brevity, is its extreme flexibility. Based on the Book of Genesis, the story and its characters can be set anywhere in any time or place. It is definitely a “feel good” musical which appeals to an audience of all ages. This was apparent last weekend when
“Joseph and The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” opened the 2017 season for South Bend Civic Theatre.

The major plus for this production is vocal. The 17-member company delivers solo and ensemble numbers with obvious enthusiasm and solid musicality. The use of head microphones by the leading characters is never overpowering and the lyrical narrative is easily understood.

southBend (IN) Civicdreamcoag  Joseph/The recorded orchestral track for the most part provides the right level of accompaniment. It is, however, unfeeling and if a singer starts incorrectly, he has to find his own way back on track. There is no “live” accompanist to help him along.

For those who have seen it before, there are no surprises in this “Joseph.” The opportunity to take it in any different direction is missed.

The Narrator (Natalie MacRae-Waggoner), a veteran of area musical productions, does not disappoint. From the opening “Prologue” to the final “Any Dream Will Do,” she fills in the missing storyline and vocally moves the plot along with a strong, full soprano and an easy presence.

Joseph (Mark Kosten) romps through family intrigue and Egyptian employment problems with a stoic air, an ingratiating grin and a pleasant baritone voice.

Always an audience favorite, Pharoah (Nicholas Hidde-Halsey) delivers a royal Elvis and earns applause for articulating “Song of the King,” his rock ‘n roll entrance, which most Pharoahs render unintelligible. His Elvis was constricted, movement-wise, by the shiny sheet which passes for a royal robe and inhibited his efforts at a real Presley swivel.

En route from Israel to Egypt, Joseph’s 11 brothers work their wicked ways with obvious delight and eventual regret. Led by Reuben (Ryan Clubine), they cover their brotherly sale, lying to dad Jacob (Brad Mazick) cowboy style (“One More Angel in Heaven”), but finally give up the ghost (and their very last sheep) with Simeon (Alexander Bobbs), recalling “Those Caanan Days.”

Joseph/Dreamcoat  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreBoth soloists have strong voices and double as Pharoah’s Butler (Bobbs) and Egyptian billionaire Potiphar (Mazick).

Sarah Holaway, Kat Quirk and Shelly Overgaard form the all-purpose trio that doubles and triples in a variety of roles from Pharoah fans to hairy Ishmalites.

As Mrs. Potiphar, Overgaard has the evening’s best line. Working to seduce Joseph, who has been purchased by her billionaire hubby, she responds to his rejection with the line: “Pity. We could make Egypt great again.”

Costuming here is best described as slipshod, with no attempt at setting period or locale, The giant set is imposing if not impressive.

The lighting design would benefit from the inclusion of spotlights on soloists. Joseph sings most of his solos in half-light. It is better to see faces!

Director Jim Geisel wisely opted to eliminate the chorus of children added late in the game, as well as the Megamix, also a late addition, which requires the cast to review the entire show in quick time.

With one intermission, this “Joseph” is really family-friendly, running just under one and one half hours.

“JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT” plays through Feb. 12 in the SBCT Wilson Theatre, 215. W. Madison St., South Bend. For show times and reservations, call (574) 234-1112 or visit sbct.org

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 February 2017 00:00
 
WW 'Carol' Sings In Christmas Season PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Tuesday, 06 December 2016 18:38

‘Tis the season— and that, of course, means the season for Rudolph and The Grinch and George Bailey and Ralphie and all manner of carols and appropriate songs of love and good will towards men.

Not the least of these is that formidable miser and all around humbug Ebenezer Scrooge.

A Christmas Carol Wagon Wheel Theatre Warsaw INNo matter how many variations you have encountered of the unforgettable characters in Charles Dickens’ ”A Christmas Carol” — film and television (live action and cartoon), play, opera, ballet and book — one that will leave you with a definite handle on the spirit of the story is among the latest.

Based, of course, on Dickens’ novella, with music by Disney’s favorite composer Alan Menken and lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, “A Christmas Carol” opened Friday evening at Warsaw’s Wagon Wheel Theatre, where it will play December weekends through Christmas Eve.

From beginning to end, this all-musical “Carol” is one of joy — visually, dramatically, melodically and in every other way that counts, and some that don’t.

A Christmas Carol  Wagon Wheel Theatre Warsaw INThe basic tale — of bitter, miserly Scrooge, his visits from three spirits and his reincarnation as the epitome of Christmas — is all there, as are all the familiar phrases: “Bah, Humbug!,” “God Bless Us Everyone!” and many more easily recognized. The plus here is that they are well sung by the talented principals and ensemble.

Director Scott Michaels, who not only choreographs this production but sings, dances and plays one of Scrooge’s indebted Londoners, turns the obviously limited WW playing space into the town square, a factory, a graveyard and a variety of other locations, all filled with singing and dancing Brits of all ages, from seniors to tiny talented youngsters.

As the about-to-be-saved Scrooge, Brett J. Frazier turns very believably from the man you love to hiss to the man who knows “how to keep Christmas well.”

Scrooge’s journey begins with a rattle of chains worn with relish by his deceased partner Jacob Marley (Mike Yocum) who rises (literally) to pay him an unwanted visit. Along with a number of ghoulish spectres, they describe his fate “Link By Link.”

Along the path to discovery, he encounters three very different — and very excellent — ghosts: the Ghost of Christmas Past (an hilariously fey Tyler Pirrung), the Ghost of Christmas Present (a delightfully dapper Chuckie Benson) and the Ghost of Christmas Future (a deceptively agile blind “hag” Jennifer Dow). All contribute to his overnight redemption via a trio of Michaels’ always mind-boggling ensemble dances, executed here with appropriately joyous enthusiasm by a combined chorus of adults, teens and young children. None miss a note or a step!!

Wrapping Victorian London in a cover of bright-colored costumes, designer Stephen R. Hollenbeck does his part in keeping the spirit bright, as does Michaels’ lighting design.

The extra-flexible setting, which quickly accents each location, is by the late Roy Hine and Michael Higgins, with swift-and-silent set-changing muscle power from cast and crew.

The icing on this holiday confection is the outstanding 10-piece orchestra under the direction of keyboardist Thomas N. Stirling, making Menken’s mostly up-tempo score a holiday delight to remember.

This production is the perfect way for a family to begin the season and carry home the familiwords of Tiny Tim (Olliver Pettit), delivered exuberantly to each and every one!

A CHRISTMAS CAROL” will be played weekends through Dec.24 in the theater at 2527 E. Center Street, Warsaw. For performance dates and times, call (574) 267-8041.

 

 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 December 2016 18:50
 
Season Starts With Music And Dance PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 02 November 2016 19:14

In anticipation of the upcoming season — and filling the gap between Halloween and Thanksgiving — Elkhart Civic Theatre presents a holiday classic,White Christmas  Elkhart Civic Theatre  Bristol IN “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas,” Friday through Nov. 19 at the Bristol Opera House. The feel-good script is filled with Berlin classics featuring the title tune as well as “Count Your Blessings,” “Sisters,” “Blue Skies,” “I Love A Piano” and “How Deep Is The Ocean.” It tells the story of two singing sisters, the duo of entertaining ex-soldiers who love them and the G.I.’s former commanding officer who needs all their help to save his New England lodge. Let the theatrical version of the ever-popular 1954 film classic light up your holidays. For show dates and times, call (574) 848-4116 between 1 and 5:30 p.m. weekdays or visit www.elkhartcivictheatre.org.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 November 2016 19:36
 
'Addams Family' To Visit Kalamazoo PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 21 October 2013 19:24

The Addams Family Miller Auditorium Kalamazoo MI“They’re creepy and they’re kooky,

            Mysterious and spooky,

They’re altogether ooky,

            The Addams Family.


Their house is a museum

            When people come to see-um,

They really are a scre-um

            The Addams Family.

   (neat, sweet, petite)

So get a witch’s shawl on,

            A broomstick you can crawl on

We’re going to make a call on

            The Addams Family!”

The familiar theme for the TV version of Charles Addams’ famous cartoons in The New Yorker magazine is one song you won’t hear in composer Andrew Lippa’s score for the touring production set to play Tuesday and Wednesday evening in Miller Auditorium at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Mich.

All the Addamses — Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, Pugsley, Grandma, Uncle Fester and even Lurch — will be ready to greet visitors at 7:30 pm. Also invited for dinner are Wednesday’s boyfriend Lucas Beinenke and his parents, Mal and Alice.

Word is this will be a ”spooktacular” meal. It seems everyone has something to hide and more than a few skeletons in their closets.

Book for this new Addams Family adventure is by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice who also are responsible for “Jersey Boys.”

Tickets range from $35 to $58. For reservations, call (269) 387-2300 or visit www.millerauditorium.com.


Last Updated on Monday, 21 October 2013 19:46
 
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