Let's Hear It From The Girls! PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Thursday, 20 June 2013 18:20

If your instant visualization of a jazz musician is a middle-aged gentleman, possibly with a receding hairline, a slightly wrinkled face and a constantly tapping toe, visualize again!

Bria Skonberg at the 2013 Elkhart (IN) Jazz FestivalNothing could be farther from the reality of two of the most talented jazz musicians being featured in the Elkhart Jazz Festival 2013.

Both are young, very talented, very attractive and very well-versed on the subject of jazz — past and present — and undoubtedly will play an important part in its future.

The only difference is that Bria Skonberg plays trumpet and flugelhorn and Ariel Pocock can be found at the piano.

Both will be familiar to regular visitors at past EJFs.

Bria came to the 2009 EJF as a member of the west coast sextet Mighty Aphrodite, an all-girl group which was a definite plus that year. She not only played but sang. Today she leads the Bria Skonberg Quintet and has changed her “coast of residence” to New York City.

Last Updated on Sunday, 23 June 2013 21:29
'Addams Family' To Visit Kalamazoo PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 21 October 2013 19:24

The Addams Family Miller Auditorium Kalamazoo MI“They’re creepy and they’re kooky,

            Mysterious and spooky,

They’re altogether ooky,

            The Addams Family.

Their house is a museum

            When people come to see-um,

They really are a scre-um

            The Addams Family.

   (neat, sweet, petite)

So get a witch’s shawl on,

            A broomstick you can crawl on

We’re going to make a call on

            The Addams Family!”

The familiar theme for the TV version of Charles Addams’ famous cartoons in The New Yorker magazine is one song you won’t hear in composer Andrew Lippa’s score for the touring production set to play Tuesday and Wednesday evening in Miller Auditorium at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Mich.

All the Addamses — Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, Pugsley, Grandma, Uncle Fester and even Lurch — will be ready to greet visitors at 7:30 pm. Also invited for dinner are Wednesday’s boyfriend Lucas Beinenke and his parents, Mal and Alice.

Word is this will be a ”spooktacular” meal. It seems everyone has something to hide and more than a few skeletons in their closets.

Book for this new Addams Family adventure is by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice who also are responsible for “Jersey Boys.”

Tickets range from $35 to $58. For reservations, call (269) 387-2300 or visit

Last Updated on Monday, 21 October 2013 19:46
:Laughter Necessary Element In ECT Farce PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Sunday, 11 September 2016 20:57

“Dying is easy, comedy is hard.”

The origin of this comment is ascribed to a variety of sources including George Burns, W.C. Fields and one (or both) of “The Sunshine Boys.”

Unnecessary Farce Elkhart Civi Theatre Bristol INWhoever said it or wherever it came from, the current Elkhart Civic Theatre production of Paul Slade Smith’s “Unnecessary Farce,” which opened Friday evening at the Bristol Opera House, is proof of its accuracy.

There are certain requisites for any farce, the most important being good timing. Add to this a large number of sturdy doors to slam; a cast of characters most of whom are several cents short of a dime and therefore manage to totally miss the obvious, even when it is staring them in the face; and a definitely absurd plotline that begins almost rationally and ends up so far off the rails it’s difficult to determine just who is who.

Unnecessary Farce  Elkhart Civic Theatre Bristol INUndaunted, and under the direction of ECT veteran David Dufour, assisted by Demaree Dufour Noneman, the intrepid septet of actors who make up the cast plunges ahead with increasing gusto. Of course, several wind up in their underwear (also a requisite in farce) which slows them down not one bit!

It doesn’t take long for the laughs to start rolling in and the premise to become even more convoluted.

In two adjoining rooms in a sleazy motel (and nobody does sleazy rooms or sturdy doors — and there are eight here and all get a really good workout — better than set designer John Shoup) the setup is focused on two cops (Angie Berkshire and Mike Nichols) waiting in one room ready to get the goods on the town mayor (Rick Nymeyer) and his accountant (Libby Uruh) reported to be meeting in the other in a matter of embezzlement.

Their visual proof will be whatever is caught on tape via a hidden camera in the mayor’s room feeding images to the TV set in the cops’ room.

Simple right? Wrong!! This is farce, remember.

Unnecessary Farce  Elkhart Civic Theatre Bristol INAdd to this mix the mayor’s wife (Jennifer Ross), looking for her husband; a security agent (Keith Sarber) who may or may not be on official business; and a mysterious (?) intruder (Tony Venable) known only as the Highland Hitman, bagpiper and enforcer for the local Scottish Clan (“That’s clan with a C”).

Officer Billie Dwyer (Berkshire) is at the end of her official training and announces frequently and eagerly “Today I become a cop.” Officer Eric Sheridan (Nichols) is her reluctant partner, who has his doubts. Together they share donuts (of course!) and the inability to successfully apprehend anybody!

Accountant Karen Brown (Unruh) is not involved in the crime but is there to catch Mayer Meekly (Nymeyer) with his hand in the till. Her undercover (literally!) relationship to Officer Sheridan is revealed to Dwyer who sits next door eating donuts and watching the video feed.

Unnecessary Farce Elkhart Civic Theatre  Bristol INAgent Frank (Sarber) is the push-me pull-you of law enforcement , especially when confronted by Highland Hitman Todd (Venable) and Mary Meekly (Ross), whose entrances are very well ill-timed.

And that’s just for starters

The gentlemen of the ensemble do well with lines and the physicality their situations demand. Berkshire and Unruh deserve applause for both verbally and physically making the most of the their characters and situations. Berkshire most especially stands out (and up!) for achieving the most hilariously convoluted semi-escape on record.

The wait for laughs and the ability to pick up the pace without losing lines are the most difficult parts of farce, as is the realization that louder does not always mean funnier.

At whatever level, “Unnecessary Farce” provides two hours (including intermission) of laughter and, today especially, there is nothing more necessary than that.

UNNECESSARY FARCE” plays Friday through Sunday in the Bristol Opera House on SR 120 In Bristol. For show times and reservations, call (574) 848-4116 or on line at www.elkhartcivictheatre.orgh

Last Updated on Sunday, 11 September 2016 21:19
Chilling Tales Shared In 'The Weir' PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 10 October 2016 18:36

If you’re the type who likes their chill factor raised via slasher films or undead supernatural TV shows, the latest South Bend Civic Theatre production — "The Weir"— won’t seem overly frightening.

The Weir  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreWhat the award-winning work by Irish playwright Connor McPerson will do is provide you with an evening of solid performances and frequently familiar characters whose easy banter reveals a universal connection.

Under the direction of Scott Jackson (one of the Michiana areas’s best!), "The Weir" focuses on the interaction of two regulars, one returnee, a newcomer and the bartender in a pub in northwest Ireland. Named for the low dam that regulates water level controlling the small town’s electricity, The Weir also serves as a safe haven for the men of the village.

The Weir South Bend (JN) Civic TheatreGathered in its familiar confines are the owner, Brendan (Marlon D. Deleon); Jack (Bill Svelmoe), a mechanic and owner of the local garage, and Jim (Ed Walin), another regular who cares for his elderly mother. They are joined by Finbar (Driscoll), a prosperous real estate broker who has just rented a house to Valerie (Dorea Britton), a young woman from Dublin.  

Over a pint (or more), they share the events of their day and, as Jack puts it, “Bullshit about all and nothing.” Tales of local events and residents somehow slip into stories of experiences with the supernatural. Each of the regulars has his own encounter to recall but the one shared by Valerie is the most chilling, being obviously her own real, and painfully recent, experience.

The Weir  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreThere is not much physical action in “The Weir,” but the emotional currents run with increasing swiftness and, as the focus shifts from one to another, the truth of Jack’s statement “There is no dark like a winter night in the country” becomes chillingly real as does the fact that the warm lights in the Weir offer each at least a temporary shelter from the wind that blows incessantly, providing an increasingly ominous underscoring of the world outside..

The strength of the production is in the performances. Each of the actors takes hold of his/her character and delivers a realistic and sometimes painful look behind the universal exterior. Relationships are revealed, restated, renewed and begun before the last lights in The Weir are shut off for the night.

There is a relaxed and easy camaraderie between Jack and Brendan that speaks to a real friendship. Jim, the third point in the triangle, seeks equal footing but is somehow frequently the odd man out. Finbar, who never forgets his economic status, is more the outsider than the new girl in town and the hostility between he and Jack is frequently palpable.

All the players are relaxed and easy with their roles, with Svelmoe perhaps the most riveting as he lets go of his initial bravado to tell of a lost love. All are perfect examples of “less is more.”

Sam Jones scenic design sets the locale immediately and the sound design by director Jackson is almost a sixth character.

“THE WEIR” plays Wednesday through Sunday in the intimate Warner Theatre in the theater at 215 W. Madison St. For performance times and reservations call (574) 234-1112 between 3 and 6 p.m.

Last Updated on Friday, 14 October 2016 03:19
'Hair' Plays Tonight At Miller Auditorium PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 15:30

The Age of Aquarius, it seems, is always with us.

hair  tour Miller Auditorium  Kalamazo MichiganOriginally on Broadway in 1968, the James Rado/Gerome Ragni/Galt MacDermott musical appropriately titled "Hair," returned to the Great White Way in 1977 and 2009, winning numerous awards with each incarnation. The most recent is now on tour, bringing its look at the movement of the '60s and '70s that changed America forever to theaters across the country. From its score, many songs have joined the list of hits on the Great American Songbook. Among these "Let The Sun Shine In," "Aquarius," "Good Morning Starshine" and the title tune.

Claude and his peace-loving friends will be on stage in (and out) of appropriate hippie attire at 7:30 p.m. today in Miller Auditorium at Western Michigan University. For tickets, call (800) 228-99858 or (269) 387-2300 or visit

For those who were "there" — and those who were not— its one way to review past mistakes and keep them from repeating themselves.  

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 February 2013 03:38
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