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Let's Hear It From The Girls! PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Thursday, 20 June 2013 18:20

If your instant visualization of a jazz musician is a middle-aged gentleman, possibly with a receding hairline, a slightly wrinkled face and a constantly tapping toe, visualize again!

Bria Skonberg at the 2013 Elkhart (IN) Jazz FestivalNothing could be farther from the reality of two of the most talented jazz musicians being featured in the Elkhart Jazz Festival 2013.

Both are young, very talented, very attractive and very well-versed on the subject of jazz — past and present — and undoubtedly will play an important part in its future.

The only difference is that Bria Skonberg plays trumpet and flugelhorn and Ariel Pocock can be found at the piano.

Both will be familiar to regular visitors at past EJFs.

Bria came to the 2009 EJF as a member of the west coast sextet Mighty Aphrodite, an all-girl group which was a definite plus that year. She not only played but sang. Today she leads the Bria Skonberg Quintet and has changed her “coast of residence” to New York City.

Last Updated on Sunday, 23 June 2013 21:29
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'Addams Family' To Visit Kalamazoo PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 21 October 2013 19:24

The Addams Family Miller Auditorium Kalamazoo MI“They’re creepy and they’re kooky,

            Mysterious and spooky,

They’re altogether ooky,

            The Addams Family.


Their house is a museum

            When people come to see-um,

They really are a scre-um

            The Addams Family.

   (neat, sweet, petite)

So get a witch’s shawl on,

            A broomstick you can crawl on

We’re going to make a call on

            The Addams Family!”

The familiar theme for the TV version of Charles Addams’ famous cartoons in The New Yorker magazine is one song you won’t hear in composer Andrew Lippa’s score for the touring production set to play Tuesday and Wednesday evening in Miller Auditorium at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Mich.

All the Addamses — Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, Pugsley, Grandma, Uncle Fester and even Lurch — will be ready to greet visitors at 7:30 pm. Also invited for dinner are Wednesday’s boyfriend Lucas Beinenke and his parents, Mal and Alice.

Word is this will be a ”spooktacular” meal. It seems everyone has something to hide and more than a few skeletons in their closets.

Book for this new Addams Family adventure is by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice who also are responsible for “Jersey Boys.”

Tickets range from $35 to $58. For reservations, call (269) 387-2300 or visit www.millerauditorium.com.


Last Updated on Monday, 21 October 2013 19:46
 
Classic Film Musical On The Barn Stage PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Thursday, 18 August 2016 17:40

It’s difficult to recreate a classic, but that’s what theater companies all over the world have been doing — or trying to do — since the M-G-M musical “Singin’ in the Rain” hit the silver screen in 1952.

Singin' in the Rain The Barn Theatre Augusta MIThe latest recreation opened Tuesday evening at The Barn Theatre in Augusta, MI.

Actually, the theatrical version didn’t happen overnight. It was 31 years after the film that the songs of Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed, combined with the book by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, made its debut in London, followed by a Broadway production in 1985.

Like that famous battery-operated bunny, it just keeps on, refusing to be stayed by one of the most difficult first act finales in live theater history (especially for small venues) — a stage full of rain.

Obviously, no matter what the level of imitation, audiences keep on lovin’ it, and The Barn production — headed by Jamey Grisham as Don Lockwood, Hannah Eakin as Kathy Selden, Sam Balzac as Cosmo Brown and Melissa Cotton Hunter as Lina Lamont — is no exception. And it works hard to keep that love alive.

Singin in the Rain The Barn Theatre nAugusta MIHunter doubles as choreographer with director Hans Friedrichs also scenic designer and on stage as Don’s diction coach. In fact, the entire company is “on,” most playing several characters.

Friedrichs’ set is definitely era-setting, with Erte`-style calla lily sconce cutouts and pedestal palms saying “1920s” without a word. Carly Heathcote’s costumes reinforce the aura with ample helpings of sequins and flapper fringe.

For many, the most unforgettable character is the dumb blonde silent screen star who destroys her image whenever she opens her mouth. Hunter’s Lina captures the “nice house, nobody home” persona of the glamour girl who only believes what she reads in fan magazines. Her solo “What’s Wrong With Me?” (added for the stage version), says it all. She does a good job of delivering Lina’s “nails on a blackboard” voice but her sometimes too-rapid-fire delivery makes it difficult to get much of her dialogue.

Gresham and Balzac have the unenviable assignment of making the audience forget their film counterparts. The former is The Barn choreographer and sometime leading man. He most resembles the perennial juvenile with a wide grin and wavy hair. To his credit, he is unfazed by the literally gallons of water through which he must dance. Even when his upturned umbrella dumps water on him, he keeps on smiling … and dancing … and singing.. Unfortunately, his light baritone voice is plagued by an ever-widening vibrato.

Balzac’s long arms and legs are most reminiscent of the late Ray Bolger and he handles the famous “Make ‘Em Laugh” sequence awkwardly but with definite promise. He and Gresham make a good team in “Fit As A Fiddle” and “Moses.”

They add Eakin for another show-stopper, “Good Morning.” She sings and dances well and delivers two lovely ballads, “Would You” and “You Are My Lucky Star.”

Singin in the Rain  The Barn Theatre  Augusta MIIn addition to Lina’s “lament,” the theatrical score has one non-film song, “You Stepped Out of A Dream,” sung by Lockwood and the ensemble for absolutely no reason at all — but, hey, this is a musical comedy, right? Disbelief suspended!

Barn veteran Eric Parker is properly bombastic as studio owner B.F. Simpson and John Jay Espino is frustrated director Roscoe Dexter, a cross between Cecil B. DeMille (costume) and Eric von Stroheim (accent) … only in Hollywood!

Of course, all’s well that ends well with everyone getting what’s(or who) is coming to him/her and the audience getting another dose of rain as the entire company reprises the title tune all the while — what else — singing and dancing and smiling!

It’s that kind of a show!

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN plays through Aug. 28 in the theater on M96 between Galesburg and Augusta, MI. For show times and reservations, call (269) 731-4121.

(NOTE: Next up is the season-ending, one-week-only comedy “Red, White and Tuna” with returning Barn favorites Scott Burkell and Joe Aiello.)

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 August 2016 17:55
 
NDSF 'Tempest' Feast For Eyes, Spirit PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 22 August 2016 02:58

In the world of theater, undoubtedly the best known name is that of Elizabethan playwright William Shakespeare.

You either love him (and his works) or …

The Tempest NDSF South Bend (IN) IAfraid I have been on the “or …” side for a goodly number of years.

Not that I don’t appreciate his incredible output and the depth of his characters, but I have always had a problem with the language. Not in the sense that I have a problem with Quentin Tarantino’s language — too much of a bad thing is a bad thing — but somehow I always have difficulty getting into the rhythm.

With the current Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival production of “The Tempest” however, (with apologies to “Hairspray”) “You just can’t stop the beat.”

From the moment the Ship-Master (Paul Hanft) lashed himself to the wheel in anticipation of the coming storm as thunder boomed, lightening flashed and towering waves threatened to overtake even the audience, I was hooked.

So what if some of the terminology went by me. There was never any doubt as to who was who, what was going on and why.

The Tempest  NDSF  South Bend INAs always, this production — as have all of the preceeding 17 mainstage shows since the Festival’s beginning in 2000 — is solidly cast.

Leading the beautifully articulate ensemble is Chicago actor/director Nick Sandys as Prospero,

rightful Duke of Milan. Cheated of his duchy by his jealous brother Antonio (Brian Sprague), with the help of Alonso, King of Naples (Jon Herrera), Prospero and his daughter Miranda (Rebecca Leiner) were cast a drift and survived with the help of Gonzalo (Alan Sader), a friendly noble, to live on an uncharted island for 12 years. Possessed of magical powers, Prospero uses his for good and waits patiently for the chance to exact his revenge.

Opportunity arrives as the story opens and, for the next two hours-plus, the stage of the Parricia Decio Theater in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center becomes the setting for love, laughter, treachery plotted and foiled, and magic, lots and lots of magic!

The Tempest  NDSF  South Bend INMiranda meets (and, of course, falls in love with) Ferdinand (Xavier Bleuel), son of King Alonso. Unfortunately, Ferdinand’s uncle, Sebastian (Guillermo Alonso) aided Antonio in his murderous attempt. But Shakespeare never lets things like this stand in the way of true love.

A generous dose of comedy is supplied by Trinculo (Jacob D’Eustachio) and Stephanie (Patricia Egglesto), servants of the king, and Caliban (Alex Podulke), deformed son of a witch. Caliban serves Prospero. The trio helps themselves to the contents of several casks of wine “liberated” by the storm and drunkenly devise their own plot.

Aiding Prospero is Ariel (Sarah Scanlon), a magical spirit rescued by Prospero and bound to serve him until he decides to release her.

The Tempest  NDSF  South Bend INAs the plots, subplots and counter plots uncoil on the magical island, it is clear that director West Hyler not only has a clear line on each of the characters but uses his association with Cirque du Soliel to underscore the enchantments, which are enabled by the use of what seems like a dozen electric floor fans.

Trust me. After the first storm rises, you don’t even notice them. In act two they provide the winds which billow gorgeous clouds of silk at the magician’s command and swirl leaves in a beautifully contained upward spiral, all the imaginative work of air designer Daniel Wurtzel, possibly best known for his paper tornado at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics closing ceremony.

Equally impressive are the effortless attitudes of Scanlon, who maintains Ariel’s mid-air perch (on a trapeze!) throughout, making each sinuous movement seem as effortless as you know it cannot be.

In act one, one of Ariel’s Quality (unnamed singers, dancers and musicians) descends via two long red fabric panels and creates a cocoon in which he/she “sleeps” for a good portion of the action.

Add to that D’Eustachio’s constant and near-perfect demonstration of the art of juggling, all the while maintaining his wily character, and you have a “Tempest” that literally has something for everyone, as evidenced by the reactions of the audience of all ages!

The overall excellence of the production is solidified by the supportive original score by Scotty Arnold, by Kevin Dryer’s mood-enhancing lighting and Marcua Stephens’ impressive scenic design.

This NDSF season is billed as “Shakespeare’s Last Words,” but after this you can be sure there will be many more to come.

“THE TEMPEST” plays through Sunday in the DeBartolo PAC on the campus of the University of Notre Dame. For performance times and reservations, call 631-2800 or visit Shakespeare.nd.edu. Children under 18 admitted free.

Last Updated on Monday, 22 August 2016 03:15
 
'Hair' Plays Tonight At Miller Auditorium PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 15:30

The Age of Aquarius, it seems, is always with us.

hair  tour Miller Auditorium  Kalamazo MichiganOriginally on Broadway in 1968, the James Rado/Gerome Ragni/Galt MacDermott musical appropriately titled "Hair," returned to the Great White Way in 1977 and 2009, winning numerous awards with each incarnation. The most recent is now on tour, bringing its look at the movement of the '60s and '70s that changed America forever to theaters across the country. From its score, many songs have joined the list of hits on the Great American Songbook. Among these "Let The Sun Shine In," "Aquarius," "Good Morning Starshine" and the title tune.

Claude and his peace-loving friends will be on stage in (and out) of appropriate hippie attire at 7:30 p.m. today in Miller Auditorium at Western Michigan University. For tickets, call (800) 228-99858 or (269) 387-2300 or visit www.millerauditorium.com.

For those who were "there" — and those who were not— its one way to review past mistakes and keep them from repeating themselves.  

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 February 2013 03:38
 
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