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Let's Hear It From The Girls! PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Thursday, 20 June 2013 18:20

If your instant visualization of a jazz musician is a middle-aged gentleman, possibly with a receding hairline, a slightly wrinkled face and a constantly tapping toe, visualize again!

Bria Skonberg at the 2013 Elkhart (IN) Jazz FestivalNothing could be farther from the reality of two of the most talented jazz musicians being featured in the Elkhart Jazz Festival 2013.

Both are young, very talented, very attractive and very well-versed on the subject of jazz — past and present — and undoubtedly will play an important part in its future.

The only difference is that Bria Skonberg plays trumpet and flugelhorn and Ariel Pocock can be found at the piano.

Both will be familiar to regular visitors at past EJFs.

Bria came to the 2009 EJF as a member of the west coast sextet Mighty Aphrodite, an all-girl group which was a definite plus that year. She not only played but sang. Today she leads the Bria Skonberg Quintet and has changed her “coast of residence” to New York City.

Last Updated on Sunday, 23 June 2013 21:29
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'Addams Family' To Visit Kalamazoo PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 21 October 2013 19:24

The Addams Family Miller Auditorium Kalamazoo MI“They’re creepy and they’re kooky,

            Mysterious and spooky,

They’re altogether ooky,

            The Addams Family.


Their house is a museum

            When people come to see-um,

They really are a scre-um

            The Addams Family.

   (neat, sweet, petite)

So get a witch’s shawl on,

            A broomstick you can crawl on

We’re going to make a call on

            The Addams Family!”

The familiar theme for the TV version of Charles Addams’ famous cartoons in The New Yorker magazine is one song you won’t hear in composer Andrew Lippa’s score for the touring production set to play Tuesday and Wednesday evening in Miller Auditorium at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Mich.

All the Addamses — Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, Pugsley, Grandma, Uncle Fester and even Lurch — will be ready to greet visitors at 7:30 pm. Also invited for dinner are Wednesday’s boyfriend Lucas Beinenke and his parents, Mal and Alice.

Word is this will be a ”spooktacular” meal. It seems everyone has something to hide and more than a few skeletons in their closets.

Book for this new Addams Family adventure is by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice who also are responsible for “Jersey Boys.”

Tickets range from $35 to $58. For reservations, call (269) 387-2300 or visit www.millerauditorium.com.


Last Updated on Monday, 21 October 2013 19:46
 
SBCT Hits High Note With 'Avenue Q' PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 17 September 2014 01:18

This is a good news/bad news look at the South Bend Civic Theatre production of “Avenue Q” which opened Sept.12 in the Warner Theatre.

The good news is the show is one of the very best put up by SBCT in its time in the new facility.alt

The bad news is, in spite of a scheduled three-week run plus one added performance, there are few, if any, seats available.

This quirky show went from Off-Broadway to Broadway in 2003, winning three Tony Awards including Best Musical. It stayed on Broadway until 2009 when it returned to Off-Broadway. It is still running today.

Avenue Q  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreThe title has a familiar ring, especially to parents of young children whose favorite TV fare is “Sesame Street,” but that’s really where the comparison ends.

Like the teaching thoroughfare of the PBS giant, “Avenue Q” has its share of life-lessons to impart and each is delivered with song, dance, love and laughter.

It is an unbeatable combination, especially in the hands of the talented SBCT troupe. Under the direction of Rick Ellis, with musical direction by Geoffrey Carter, its positive messages strike home with humor and honesty in a wide number of areas — relationships, race and religion, to name just a few.

If you think these topics have been examined theatrically ad nauseum, you are correct. But on Avenue Q, they get a new twist.

Eleven of the characters are puppets. Not the string variety but unique and hilariously individual “attachments” to six of the nine featured players.

Actually, the “attachments” are puppets controlled by human performers, some of whom play multiple characters. There is no attempt to hide the humans. In fact, they stand tall with one hand inside the puppet and, for the most part, the other on a long stick attached to the puppet’s “free” hand.

Avenue Q  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreFor those who think this might be a bit disconcerting, know that within just a few minutes, you don’t even notice the “real people.”

They make it look easy.

Lisa Blodgett as Christmas Eve, the Asian American (don’t call her Oriental!) therapist, and Travis Mayer as her unemployed would-be comedian fiancé, Brian, and Andre Spathelf-Sanders as Gary Coleman (yes, that Gary Coleman) are the only players who do not “control” a specific puppet.

Avenue Q  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreAt the center is Princeton (the ultra-versatile Sean Leyes), a college grad searching for his purpose in life. His very limited budget brings him apartment hunting on Avenue Q. It proves to be a diverse and uniquely entertaining area.

Meeting his neighbors makes him realize that, although the problems may not be the same, everybody has at least one.

Fellow residents are Kate Monster (SBCT veteran Natalie MacRae), a kindergarten teaching assistant; mis-matched roommates Nicky (Mike Barnette) and Republican investment banker Rod (Joel Stockton); Internet porn addict Trekkie Monster (one of Kevin James’ personae which include a Bad Idea Bear, a Moving Box, Ricky and a Newcomer); and last but definitely never least, Lucy the Slut (Shelly Overgaard who also is a Bad Idea Bear, a Moving Box and Mrs. T, Kate Monster’s crabby boss, who declares “Crabby old bitches are the bedrock of this nation!”).

Avenue Q South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreThe ways in which this unlikely ensemble interacts through times good and not-so-good are not only wonderfully entertaining but deliver solid footnotes beneath the laughter.

The set by Jaycee Rohick is multi-purposful, allowing “regular” entrances and exits as well as providing “screens” for the many video inserts, all of which are sharp and clear and an integral part of the action. (Note the SBCT execs whose resemblance to The Muppets’ crotchety old men in the box has to be deliberate.)

 Most of the actors have solo voices, especially Leyes and MacRae, but all have a solid grasp (no pun intended) on their puppet(s) and are a solid vocal ensemble.

Obviously, a big part of any “Avenue Q” is the puppets, here the work of puppet designer/builder/trainer Dave Rozmarynowski. Each one is exactly right for its character and, combined with some very fine “controlling,” achieves the desired effect.

As in life, we can hide some of the time and let our puppets do the talking but, in the end, reality awaits.

Taking “Avenue Q” to get there is more than half the fun!

“AVENUE Q” plays through Sept.  28 in the SBCT Warner Theatre. For information and reservations, call (574) 234-1112 or visit www.sbct.org.

Note: Production contains adult language, themes and puppet nudity (also puppet sex).

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 September 2014 21:32
 
'Frankenstein' Less Horror More Confusion PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Monday, 20 October 2014 20:58

In the early 19th century, a young English author accepted the challenge of writing the best horror story and, in 1918, “Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus” was published — anonymously.

Anonymously because the young author was a female — Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley.

Frankenstein  South Bend (IN)( Civic TheatreSince that time, the tale of the young scientist who created life and reaped its fatal rewards, has been a real favorite of horror fiction fans in many genres, most especially in theater and films.

Undoubtedly the most popular (and best known) is the 1931 movie that brought stardom to Boris Karloff as “The Creature” and contained one of the best known lines of dialogue, “It’s Alive! It’s Alive.”

That version focused on the story of Victor Frankenstein and his creation and was followed in 1935 by “The Bride of Frankenstein.” Both took liberties with the plot and characters. As written by Mary Shelley, the story is most closely followed in the 1994 Kenneth Branaugh film, which begins and ends in the Arctic Circle via the narrative of Capt. Robert Walton.

There have been countless movies, TV adaptations and even a musical comedy, all putting their own spins on the famous story. This is because “Frankenstein” is in the public domain. Translation: Anyone can do anything he/she wants with the characters, location and story. Sometimes, as with putting Shakespeare in modern times, this works well. Sometimes it doesn’t.

The latter is, unfortunately, true of the “world premiere” of the South Bend Civic Theatre version of “Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus” which opened Friday evening in the Wilson Theatre.The production is the result of many months of work, first in a number of workshops during which interested community members read the book and discussed several aspects of content and production they felt would be best suited to telling the story and bringing it to the stage.

Frankenstein South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreTheir ideas were given to director Jim Geisel and director Terry Farren and the process continued through a stage reading and further rewriting, the result of which is on the SBCT stage through Nov.2.

Frankenstein  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreThis most recent staging incorporates flowing panels, a series of platforms and a lot of wooden crates reconfigured frequently to suggest different locations. Also ghostly projections and some very thunderous sound effects.

The story is told here by the Zeklos Traveling Theatrical Troupe. With the exception of Victor (Matthew Bell) and The Creature (Phil Kwiecinski), the five troupe members (Megan  Michele, Judy Spigle, Don Elliott, Dan Slattery and Jared Windhauser) portray all the other characters with varying degrees of success.

They swoop on wearing white “Phantom”-style masks and swirling grey Greek chorus-style sheets. Nothing helps to distinguish what they are saying as they set the stage.

As the action progresses slowly, it becomes apparent that the Karloff version has gone overboard in favor of the Branaugh, adding characters from the latter that may be unfamiliar to those who only know the ’31 film.

Even if you have read the book, the action — and characters — are so muddled and most frequently unintelligible that it is most often impossible to follow.

The actors all work hard but too frequently to no avail. The action never really becomes clear and the narrative remains ponderous rather than focused.

The panels contribute somewhat to the horrific effects (think shrouds) and are used well with the projections but the sheets ultimately exacerbate the action rather than clarifying the plotline.

The lighting design by Sarah Akers does much to set the other-worldly mood and the beating heart underscores with just the right amount of Poe-etic license.

“FRANKENSTEIN or THE MODERN PROMETHEUS” plays through Nov. 2 in the Wilson Theatre at South Bend Civic Theatre, 403 North Main St. For performance times and reservations, call 234-1112 or visit www.sbct.com

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 October 2014 17:46
 
'Hair' Plays Tonight At Miller Auditorium PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 15:30

The Age of Aquarius, it seems, is always with us.

hair  tour Miller Auditorium  Kalamazo MichiganOriginally on Broadway in 1968, the James Rado/Gerome Ragni/Galt MacDermott musical appropriately titled "Hair," returned to the Great White Way in 1977 and 2009, winning numerous awards with each incarnation. The most recent is now on tour, bringing its look at the movement of the '60s and '70s that changed America forever to theaters across the country. From its score, many songs have joined the list of hits on the Great American Songbook. Among these "Let The Sun Shine In," "Aquarius," "Good Morning Starshine" and the title tune.

Claude and his peace-loving friends will be on stage in (and out) of appropriate hippie attire at 7:30 p.m. today in Miller Auditorium at Western Michigan University. For tickets, call (800) 228-99858 or (269) 387-2300 or visit www.millerauditorium.com.

For those who were "there" — and those who were not— its one way to review past mistakes and keep them from repeating themselves.  

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 February 2013 03:38
 
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