MarciaMarciaMarcia
Timeless Tale Gets Musical Makeover PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Wednesday, 06 February 2013 21:15

Honk Jr.  ECTeam  Elkhart Civic Theatre  Bristol INWho has not, at one time or another, felt like an ugly duckling?

These feelings were described two centuries ago by Danish author and poet Hans Christian Andersen, in his stories or “fantastic tales.” Frequently thought of as fairy tales for children, they actually apply to all ages.

Among the most popular is “The Ugly Duckling.”

About 10 years ago, composer George Stiles and lyricist Anthony Drewe took Andersen’s fable and set it to music. The result was “Honk!” and, for younger performers, “Honk Jr!” which follows Ugly, the “odd egg out” of his mother Ida’s brood, on a delightful and sometime hazardous journey to find himself and iauroduces many varied characters who help — and sometimes hinder —him along the way.

“Honk Jr!” will be presented by the ECTeam of performers ages 8 to 18 at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in the Bristol Opera House.

Leading roles will be played by Gavin Rusel as Ugly, Sara Nolan as mom Ida, Joel Lininger as dad Drake and Bethany Wirick as the devious Cat.

Honk Jr. ECTeam of Elkhart Civic Theatre Bristol INHaving seen the ECTeam’s productions before, I can only urge families to get their tickets NOW! Under the direction of Brock Butler, assisted by Karen Johnston, with Kim Dooley as vocal director and Kristen Riggs, choreographer, I guarantee “Honk Jr!” will be a really fun evening for the whole family.

NOTE: The relatives whom cast members “reckon up by dozens” waste no time in making reservations for the limited run ECTeam productions, so make yours now.

“HONK JR!” will play at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in the Bristol Opera House, 120 E. Jackson in Bristol. For reservations, call 848-4116 between 1 and 5:30 p.m. weekdays or visit www.elkhartcivictheatre.org at any time!

Last Updated on Wednesday, 06 February 2013 21:44
 
Sondheim + WW = Musical Theatre Magic PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Friday, 11 August 2017 16:25

Warsaw’s Wagon Wheel Theater has led the pack this summer with a lineup of widely varied productions, all beautifully done.

Now, in the final show of the scheduled season, it seems it has saved the best for last.

Into the Woods  WagonWheel Theatre Warsaw INIt is no secret that my very favorite musical theater composer is Stephen Sondheim. I would, in fact, go miles to see/hear anything with which he is connected..

I have a Top Five list of favorites, at the very top of which (or, at least , in the number two spot) is ‘Into The Woods,” Sondheim’s version of fractured fairy tales, a collaboration with playwright James Lapine.

Not only is it a brilliant blending of familiar childhood favorites, but it is filled with a wildly weird assortment of characters, melodies that will not leave your head and a solid list of words — or phrases — to live by.

It also echoes everyone’s hope of getting through life’s darkest woods to find a happily ever after.

Being so committed to this piece, I approach every production with hope and fear. Hope that it will at least come close to my expectations and fear that it will not.

Into the Woods  Wagon Wheel Theatre  Warsaw INThe minute we walked into the Wagon Wheel Theatre Wednesday evening, I knew the next few hours would exceed my highest expectations.

And I was right!!

Even before the music begins (and director Thomas N. Sterling and his always-excellent orchestra more than do justice to the intricate score), even before that, there is the jaw-dropping set by Ray Zupp (“Young Frankenstein,” “The Addams Family”) that leaves you standing in the lobby, staring over the seats and anxious to get a closer look.

I would say you have to see it to believe it, but…well, you really do! And that’s just the beginning!

The orchestra goes into the pit, announcements are made and the lights finally fade, to rise again on the woods and the inhabitants of its outlying areas:

Jack (Blake Bojewski), his Mother (Kathy Haskins) and Milky White (Grace Robinson), his cow;

Little Red Riding Hood (Allsun O’Malley) and her Granny (Jennifer Dow);

Into thr Eoofd  Wagon Wheel Theatre  Warsaw  INCinderella (Sarah Ariel Brown), her stepmother (Leanne Antonio), her stepsisters Lucinda (Dow) and Florinda (Bailee Enderbrock), her father (Mike Yocum) and her Prince (Ben Ahlers);

the Baker (Riley McFarland) and his wife (Kelly Britt);

Rapunzel (Kira Ziringer) and her Prince (Michael Bradley);

plus assorted others — the Witch (Kira Lace Hawkins), the Big Bad Wolf (Ahlers), the Narrator/Mysterious Man (Brett Frazier) and the Steward (Michael Pacholski).

And no one who goes into the woods, comes out of the woods unchanged (or alive).

Put them all together and they make a formidable vocal ensemble, and ensemble work a la Sondheim is nothing if not formidable. Not only do they make it sound easy but, in spite of overlapping melodic lines and lyrics, quite easily understood.

Each of the major players has his/her share of solos and each delivers beautifully! Kira Lace Hawkins (who I now believe can do anything!) is completely unfazed by her opening speed-singing rap, her poignant duet with Ziringer and, of course, her show-stopping “The Last midnight.” And she definitely knows how to make an exit!!!

Britt is a pleasure to listen to in solo or duet and creates a no-nonsense wife who seeks motherhood but, yearning for a bit of romance, finds more than she bargained for.

O’Malley is a delightful Red Riding Hood, skipping into and around danger with naïve abandon., never mind that the Big Bad Wolf is on her trail. As the seductive Wolf, Ahlers sheds his fur to become Cinderella’s Prince and, with Bradley, shares my favorite double duet, “Agony,” which hilariously nails the shifting fancies of princes.

Into the Woods  Wagon Wheel Theatre  Warsaw  INBojewski and McFarland have wonderfully rich and strong baritone voices that audibly mark their changes from awkward young men to adult males, determined to come out of the woods on the right paths. It is easy to empathize with their journeys.

Frazier carries the strong narrative and shifts personas slickly to add to the overall mystery and Kathy Hawkins proves that, in or out of the woods, mothers are the same.

Must give applause to Robison. Never seen out of costume, and without singing a note, she gives a great deal of character and personality to long-suffering Milky White.

As always, Stephen R. Hollenbeck’s costumes are the icing on this cake, especially in facilitating the Witch’s transformation. Crowning Hollenbeck’s costumes are Dow’s varied (and secure) wigs, which here help the Witch regain youth and beauty.

“Into The Woods” is directed and choreographed (and the last includes a lot more than dancing here) by WW artistic director Scott Michaels, who continues to set the standards so high they would stop a lesser artist. Michaels just sails right over them!

Behind him — or beside him — are lighting designer Patrick Chan, who seems able to create fantasy with the flick of a switch,; sound designer Chris Pollnow, who supplies the balance between singers and instrumentalists; technical director Jacki Anderson, who makes sure all circuits are clear; production manager Mike Higgins and production stage manager Nick Voight, who is in charge when the lights go up.

Along with their respective crews, they create magic every two weeks of the summer in Warsaw.

Do not miss this one!!

INTO THE WOODS plays through Aug. 19 in the theater at 2517 E. Center St. in Warsaw. For performance times and reservations, call (574) 267-8041.

Last Updated on Friday, 11 August 2017 16:44
 
Changes PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Tuesday, 26 April 2011 17:14

John Brian QuinnI have always been a big fan of musicals, especially old musicals and the timeless tunes they introduced. It seems appropriate then that my tune for today is “There’ll Be Some Changes Made.” The title applies specifically to MarciaMarciaMarcia.net which is about to undergo some great changes, thanks to my dear friend (and former Elkhartan) the multi-talented John Brian Quinn! He has taken on the task of turning my website from static and one-dimensional to WOW! Beginning now, not only will there be a spot for reviews, but also for just about anything I can think of that deals with the arts AND a place for anyone to shoot me a question — serious or silly — about any and all things theatrical. Can’t guarantee to find all the right answers, but I guarantee to try. So please enjoy the new me! I know I do!

Last Updated on Saturday, 30 April 2011 19:18
 
Newsboya Fight The System In 'Newsies' PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Thursday, 10 August 2017 16:00

There’s not a princess in sight as “Newsies” bursts on to the stage of The Barn Theatre where the Disney musical opened Tuesday evening.

Disneyh's Newsies GThe Barn Theatre Augusta MIInstead the maximum energy is supplied by a bunch of feisty ragamuffins, all ready to sell the day’s copy of the New York World. Lest the audience expect pastels (from Disney), everything is in varying shades if brown, black and grey.

Lining up to buy their daily allotment (for resale to the public), the newsboys are led by Jack Kelly (Jonnie Carpathios), who shares his dreams of going to “Sante Fe” with his crippled best friend and fellow newsboy Crutchie (Justin M. Roth).

The story of their fight for fair treatment — and money — is based on an actual 1899 newsboys strike in New York City — plus a little romance thrown in because, after all, it is a Disney show, complete with music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Jack Feldman and book by Harvey Feldstein.

Disney's Newsies The Barn Theatre Augusta MI“Newsies” seems to be the musical of choice this summer, even though it is based on a 1992 film that became a Broadway musical in 2012 and there is, of necessity, very little color in set and costumes.

Except, of course, for the scenes in a vaudeville theatre where headliner Medda Larkin (Samantha Rickard) is a friend for whom Jack paints backdrops.

The jet propulsion in this Disney’s “Newsies” is supplied by the ensemble of urchins who leap, stamp, holler and, at one point, tap like mad, at the drop of a tear sheet (“Carrying the Banner”).

With choreography by James Gresham, who is also a newsboy, the crowd of energetic urchins tears up the boards at the drop of a penny and was received with sustained cheers throughout the 2 ½ hour performance.

Disneh's Newsies The Barn Theatre Augusta MIJack’s love interest is supplied by Katherine Plumber (Kasady Kwiatkowska), an aspiring lady journalist who has her own agenda.

His right hand newsboy is Davey (Nick Barakos) who, with his younger brother Les (Brandon Davis/Henry Dunn — it doesn’t say which one is playing which performance), doesn’t fit the orphan code of the newsboys — they have both parents.

When World owner Joseph Pulitzer (Richard Marlatt), (yes, the Pulitzer Prize Pulitzer!), decides to raise the newsboys cost from 50 to 60 cents per 100 in order to increase circulation (“The Bottom Line”), Jack instigates a strike (“Seize the Day”).

Strikebreakers and police break up the rally and the end finds Crutchie in The Refuge, a juvenile detention center run by the evil Warden Snyder (Charlie King).

Will Jack rescue his friend, defeat the capitalist and win the girl?

If you can’t answer that, you don’t know Disney.

With an unflagging energy that seems never to lessen, Carpathios is indeed the focal point of “Newsies”, but the actual highlights are the equally unflagging newsboys.

On and off the stage and every available table and chair, up and down auditorium aisles and the on-stage stairways of scenic designer Samantha Snow, they accomplished every move with observable glee.

Vocally, their blend was solid and frequently moving.

Among the principals, with the exception of Roth, all seemed inclined to push, frequently resulting in rather unpleasantly harsh tones. This may resolve itself as performances go on and the balance between singers and instrumentalists evens out.

There is no doubt that everyone was doing his/her duty in “Newsies,” even director Hans Friedrichs was called into action. Of course making sure he never relinquished command, he is playwright Fierstein’s deus ex machina — the man on the white horse who saves the day — President Teddy Roosevelt.

Diisney’s “NEWSIES” plays through Aug. 20 in the theater on M96 in Augusta, MI. for performance times and reservations call (269) 731-4121.

Last Updated on Thursday, 10 August 2017 16:24
 
Classic Drama Alive Today at Wagon Wheel PDF Print E-mail
Written by Marcia Fulmer   
Saturday, 29 July 2017 20:34

  Midway in the annual summer theatrical season of music and dance and a lot of happy endings, the Wagon Wheel Theatre offers a change of pace with a classic American drama/tragedy that should be at the top of everyone’s “must-see” list.
  The Cfrucible  Wagon Wheel Theatre  Watsaw INIn making Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible” a part of its regular 2017 lineup, artistic director Scott Michaels was aware that it was a risk, but risk-taking has never deterred the award-winning director or the team of actor/directors Ben Dicke and Andy Robinson, whose annual behind-the-scenes effort is usually a comedy.
  Their determination has paid off in more ways than one.
  Not only is this production theater at its best and, in a dark way, incredibly entertaining, but it offers some of the best of this year’s company challenging roles, challenges to which they rise with naturalistic ease — even those with the most villainous assignments

The Crucible  Wagon Wheel Theatre  Warsaw INFor those who may not know, “The Crucible” combines historical fact and artistic license in telling the horrendous story of the 17th century Salem (Mass.) witch trials.   Playwright Miller admitted his Tony Award-winning play was an allegory for McCarthyism, but — listen. It is chilling how close 1953 was to 1692-93 and to the present day.
  It begins with Betty Parris (Cordelia Grandon) 8-year-old daughter of the Salem pastor, the Rev. Samuel Parris (Ben Ahlers) in a faint from which she rises only to scream. Parris demands to know what she was doing in the woods at night with a group of other young girls.

The answer is dancing, which Parris interprets as witchcraft. It results in the girls hiding their late-night outing by naming many others as witches.
Led by Abigail Williams (McKenzie Kurtz) the accusations spread and result is the arrest, “questioning” and eventual hanging of many of the good people of Salem and surrounding villages.

Abigail eventually accuses Elizabeth Proctor (Kira Lace Hawkins), wife of John Proctor (Riley McFarland), with whom Abigail had an affair. Elizabeth is questioned in her home by Reverend John Hale (Blake R. Bojewski), a reported expert on witchcraft.

As the list of accused lengthens, Deputy Governor Danforth (Mike Yocum) arrives to serve as judge. Slowly even the initial accusers become aware of the false charges but, once Danforth is on the bench, innocence is irrelevant and guilt is proven by the flimsiest proof and events attributed to “unnatural forces” and the fact that the accusers are “inno ent children.”

The Crucible  Wagon Wheel Theatre  Warsaw INThe final blackout offers some hope that the mass hysteria will subside and, finally, disappear. It eventually did, but its shadows remain and, even today, unhappily return in force.
Wagon Wheel season ticket holders may be those most aware of the excellent 2017 cast, having seen each in an extremely wide variety of roles. Even first-timers in the audience, however, will be unable to miss the richness of the performances.
Must first credit the primary players — Ahlers, Bojewski, Hawkins, Kurtz, McFarland, Yocum and Allsun O’Malley. The last was Mary Warren, the Proctors’ maid, who agreed to tell the truth then fell back under the spell of Abigail Williams.
The danger of even the slightest accusation was made obvious by Giles Corey (Michael Bradley) whose questions about books his wife was reading led eventually to her going to the gallows.
The directors’ decision to use hymns, sung acapella by the gathering ensemble, works beautifully throughout to smoothly underscore the fatal role religion played in the outcome of the witch trials.
The spare set, a raked platform seemingly constructed of wooden planks, was designed by technical director Jacki Anderson. It sets the mood immediately as do Stephen R. Hollenbeck’s earth-toned costumes. The excellent lighting design by Fritz Weaver makes one always aware of the dangers hidden in the shadows.
THE CRUCIBLE plays through Aug. 5 in the theater at 2517 E. Center Street in Warsaw. For performance times and reservations, call (574) 267-8041.
Last Updated on Saturday, 29 July 2017 21:50
 
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